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Sport Pilot NPRM
Q & A Format

SFAR NO. 89

SPORT PILOT CERTIFICATION

General

Section

1. What is the purpose of this SFAR?

3. When am I eligible for a certificate under this SFAR?

5. Does this SFAR expire?

7. Does a sport pilot certificate issued under this SFAR expire?

9. What is a light-sport aircraft?

11. Who is an authorized instructor?

13. Do regulations other than those contained in this SFAR apply to a sport pilot?

15. Must I hold an airman medical certificate?

17. Am I prohibited from operating a light-sport aircraft if I have a medical deficiency?

Student Pilot Certificate to Operate Light-Sport Aircraft

31. How do I apply for a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft?

33. What solo requirements must a student pilot operating light-sport aircraft meet?

35. Are there any limits on how a student pilot may operate a light-sport aircraft?

37. How do I obtain privileges to operate in Class B, C, or D airspace and at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace?

Sport Pilot Certificate

51. What aeronautical knowledge must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

53. What flight proficiency requirements must I meet to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

55. What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

57. What tests do I have to take to receive a sport pilot certificate?

59. Will my sport pilot certificate list light-sport aircraft category and class ratings?

61. May I operate all categories, classes, and makes and models of light-sport aircraft with my sport pilot certificate?

63. How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

65. How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional make and model of light-sport aircraft?

67. Must I carry my logbook with me in the aircraft?

Privileges and Limits of Holders of a Sport Pilot Certificate

71. What type of aircraft may I fly if I hold a sport pilot certificate?

73. What are my limits for the operation of light-sport aircraft?

75. May I demonstrate an aircraft in flight to a prospective buyer?

77. May I carry a passenger?

79. May I share operating expenses of a flight with a passenger?

81. How do I obtain privileges to operate in Class B, C, or D airspace?

83. How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS?

Transitioning to a Sport Pilot Certificate

91. How do I obtain a sport pilot certificate if I already hold at least a private pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61?

93. How do I obtain a sport pilot certificate if I do not hold a pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61, but I have been flying ultralight vehicles under 14 CFR part 103?

95. How do I obtain a sport pilot certificate if I donít hold a pilot certificate and have never flown an ultralight vehicle?

Flight Instructor Certificate With a Sport Pilot Rating

111. Must I hold an airman medical certificate?

113. What aeronautical knowledge requirements must I meet to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

115. What training must I have in areas of operation to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

117. What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

119. What tests do I have to take to get a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

121. What records do I have to keep and for how long?

123. Will my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating list light-sport aircraft category and class ratings?

125. Am I authorized to provide training in all categories and classes of light-sport aircraft with my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

127. How do I obtain privileges to provide flight training in an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

129. How do I obtain privileges authorizing me to provide flight training in an additional make and model of light-sport aircraft?

131. Do I need to carry my logbook with me in the aircraft?

133. What privileges do I have if I hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

135. What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

137. Are there any additional qualifications for training first-time flight instructor applicants?

139. May I give myself an endorsement?

Transitioning to a Flight Instructor Certificate With a Sport Pilot Rating

151. What if I already hold a flight instructor certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61 and want to exercise the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

153. What if I am only a registered ultralight instructor with an FAA recognized ultralight organization?

155. What if Iíve never provided flight or ground training in an aircraft or an ultralight vehicle?

Pilot Logbooks

171. How do I log training time and aeronautical experience?

173. How do I log pilot-in-command flight time?

175. May I use training time and aeronautical experience logged as a sport pilot toward a higher certificate or rating issued under 14 CFR part 61?

177. May I credit training time and aeronautical experience logged as an ultralight operator toward a sport pilot certificate?

179. May I use aeronautical experience I got as the operator of an ultralight vehicle to meet the requirements for a higher certificate or rating issued under 14 CFR part 61?

Recent Flight Experience Requirements for a Sport Pilot Certificate

or a Flight Instructor Certificate With a Sport Pilot Rating

191. What recent flight experience requirements must I meet for a sport pilot certificate?

193. What are the flight review requirements for a sport pilot certificate?

195. How do I renew my flight instructor certificate?

197. What must I do if my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires?

Ground Instructor Privileges

211. What are the eligibility requirements for a ground instructor certificate?

213. What additional privileges do I have if I hold a ground instructor certificate with a basic ground instructor rating?

215. What additional privileges do I have if I hold a ground instructor certificate with an advanced ground instructor rating?

General

Section 1. What is the purpose of this SFAR?

This SFARó

(a) Establishes requirements to apply for a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft, a sport pilot certificate, and a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating;

(b) Expands the privileges of ground instructors to permit them to provide training for a sport pilot certificate and for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating; and

(c) Establishes the following for the certificates and ratings issued by FAA under the provisions of this SFAR:

(1) Eligibility requirements;

(2) Experience requirements;

(3) Testing requirements;

(4) Endorsements;

(5) Privileges and limitations;

(6) Logging of ground and flight time;

(7) Recent flight experience requirements; and

(8) Transition provisions.

Section 3. When am I eligible for a certificate under this SFAR?

(a) See the following table for the eligibility requirements for the different kinds of airman certificates issued under this SFAR:

To be eligible for aÖ

You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand English and be...

(1) Student pilot certificate for operating light-sport aircraft,

At least 16 (or 14 if you are applying to operate a glider or balloon).

(2) Sport pilot certificate,

At least 17 (or 16 if you are applying to operate a glider or balloon.

(3) Flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating,

(i) At least 18; and

(ii) Hold a current and valid sport pilot certificate or a current and valid private pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61.

(b) If you canít read, speak, write, and understand English due to medical requirements, the FAA may place limitations on your certificate as are necessary for the safe operation of light-sport aircraft.

 

Section 5. Does this SFAR expire?

This SFAR will remain in effect until superceded, rescinded, or until it is incorporated into the permanent portion of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations.

Section 7. Does a sport pilot certificate issued under this SFAR expire?

No, a sport pilot certificate issued under this SFAR does not expire.

Section 9. What is a light-sport aircraft?

A light-sport aircraft is defined in 14 CFR 1.1.

Section 11. Who is an authorized instructor?

An authorized instructor is defined in 14 CFR 61.1.

Section 13. Do regulations other than those contained in this SFAR apply to a sport pilot?

Yes. As a certificated pilot, you must comply with 14 CFR part 61 and with the general operating and flight rules under 14 CFR part 91 of this chapter. In addition, you must comply with all other applicable regulations under this chapter.

Section 15. Must I hold an airman medical certificate?

In lieu of the provisions of 14 CFR 61.23(a)(3)(iii), which require a student pilot to hold an airman medical certificate, you must hold and possess while exercising the privileges of a student pilot certificate to operate a light-sport aircraft or a sport pilot certificate, when operating other than a glider or balloon:

(a) A current and valid U.S. driverís license; or

(b) A current and valid airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67.

Section 17. Am I prohibited from operating a light-sport aircraft if I have a medical deficiency?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate or a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft Ö

AndÖ

ThenÖ

(a) That is a glider or balloon,

---

You must not act as pilot in command of the aircraft if you know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make you unable to operate the aircraft in a safe manner.

(b) Other than a glider or balloon,

You hold a U.S. driverís license (regardless of whether you hold an airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67),

You must not act as pilot in command of the aircraft if you know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make you unable to operate the aircraft in a safe manner.

(c) Other than a glider or balloon,

(1) You hold an airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67, but donít hold a U.S. driverís license,

(i) You must not act as pilot in command of the aircraft if:

(A) You know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make you unable to meet the requirements of at least a third-class medical certificate; or

(B) You are taking medication or receiving other treatment for a medical condition that results in you being unable to meet the requirements of at least a third-class medical certificate.

Student Pilot Certificate for Operating Light-Sport Aircraft

Section 31. How do I apply for a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft?

Use the following table to determine how to apply for a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft:

If Ö

ThenÖ

(a) You are operating a balloon or glider, or you have a current and valid airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67, or a current and valid U.S. driverís license,

You must apply for a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft with a Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) or an FAA designated pilot examiner.

(b) You are not operating a balloon or a glider, you do not have a current and valid airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67, and you are not able to get a current and valid U.S. driverís license,

You must apply for a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft

and an airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67 with an FAA aviation medical examiner.

 

 

 

Section 33. What solo requirements must a student pilot operating light-sport aircraft meet?

(a) To operate a light-sport aircraft in solo flight, you must meet the requirements under 14 CFR 61.87(a) through (c).

(b) If you are receiving training for single-engine airplane, glider, gyroplane, airship, or balloon privileges, you must receive and log flight training for the maneuvers and procedures specified in 14 CFR 61.87(d), (g), and (i) through (k), as applicable.

(c) If you are receiving training for powered parachute or weight-shift-control aircraft privileges, you must receive and log flight training for the following maneuvers and procedures:

(1) Proper flight preparation procedures, including preflight planning and preparation, preflight assembly and rigging, aircraft systems, and powerplant operations;

(2) Taxiing or surface operations, including run-ups;

(3) Takeoffs and landings, including normal and crosswind;

(4) Straight and level flight, and turns in both directions;

(5) Climbs, and climbing turns in both directions;

(6) Airport traffic patterns, including entry and departure procedures;

(7) Collision avoidance, windshear avoidance, and wake turbulence

avoidance;

(8) Descents and descending turns in both directions;

(9) Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions;

(10) Ground reference maneuvers;

(11) Recovery from partial canopy collapse (powered parachute only);

(12) Meta-stable stalls and avoidance (powered parachute only);

(13) Flight at various airspeeds from maximum cruise to slow flight (weight-shift-control aircraft only);

(14) Stall entry, stall, and stall recovery (weight-shift-control aircraft only);

(15) Straight glides, and gliding turns in both directions;

(16) Go-arounds;

(17) Approaches to landing areas with a simulated engine malfunction;

(18) Procedures for canopy packing and aircraft disassembly (powered parachute only); and

(19) Procedures for disassembly (weight-shift-control aircraft only).

(d) Solo cross-country flight requirements. You may not operate a light-sport aircraft on a solo cross-country flight unless you have met the requirements specified in 14 CFR 61.93(a) through (c).

(e) Maneuvers and procedures for solo cross-country flight training in a single-engine airplane, glider, gyroplane, or airship. If you are receiving training for single-engine airplane, glider, gyroplane, or airship privileges you must receive and log flight training for the maneuvers and procedures specified in 14 CFR 61.93 (e), (h), (j), and (k), as applicable.

(f) If you are receiving training for powered parachute and weight-shift control privileges, you must receive and log flight training in the following maneuvers and procedures:

(1) Use of aeronautical charts for VFR navigation using pilotage and dead reckoning with the aid of a magnetic compass;

(2) Use of aircraft performance charts pertaining to cross-country flight;

(3) Procurement and analysis of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts, including recognition of critical weather situations and estimating visibility while in flight;

(4) Emergency procedures;

(5) Traffic pattern procedures that include area departure, area arrival, entry into the traffic pattern, and approach;

(6) Procedures and operating practices for collision avoidance, wake turbulence precautions, and windshear avoidance;

(7) Recognition, avoidance, and operational restrictions of hazardous terrain features in the geographical area where the cross-country flight will be flown;

(8) Procedures for operating the instruments and equipment installed in the aircraft to be flown, including recognition and use of the proper operational procedures and indications;

(9) If equipped for flight using navigation radios, the procedures for the use of radios for VFR navigation; and

(10) Recognition of weather and upper air conditions favorable for the cross-country flight.

Section 35. Are there any limits on how a student pilot may operate a light-sport aircraft?

As a student pilot you may not operate a light-sport aircraft:

(a) Unless you comply with 14 CFR 61.87(l) and 61.89 (a)(1) through (a)(4), (a)(7), (a) (8), and (b);

(b) With a flight or surface visibility of less than 3 statute miles;

(c) In flight at night;

(d) At an altitude of more than 10,000 feet MSL or 2,000 feet AGL, whichever is higher;

(e) That exceeds a VH of 87 knots CAS;

(f) Outside of the United States;

(g) In Class B, C, or D airspace or at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace; unless you have received the ground and flight training from an instructor authorized to provide training and any logbook endorsement necessary for the solo flight;

(h) Contrary to any operating limitation placed on the airworthiness certificate of the aircraft being flown; or

(i) Contrary to any limitation or endorsement on your pilot certificate, airman medical certificate, U.S. driverís license, or any other limitation or endorsement from an authorized instructor.

Section 37. How do I obtain privileges to operate in Class B, C, or D airspace and at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace?

If you hold a student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft and seek to obtain privileges to operate in Class B, C, or D airspace or at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace, you must receive and log ground and flight training from an authorized instructor. The instructor must provide a logbook endorsement that certifies you are proficient in the following aeronautical knowledge areas and areas of operation:

(a) The use of radios, communications, navigation systems and facilities, and radar services;

(b) Operations at airports with an operating control tower, to include 3 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower;

(c) Applicable flight rules of 14 CFR part 91 for operations in Class B, C, or D airspace and ATC clearances;

(d) Ground training for the specific airspace for which the solo flight is authorized, and flight training in the specific airspace for which the solo flight is authorized within the 90-day period preceding the date of the flight into that airspace; and

(e) Ground and flight training for the specific airport for which the solo flight is authorized, if applicable, within the 90-day period preceding the date of the flight at that airport.

Sport Pilot Certificate

Section 51. What aeronautical knowledge must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

To apply for a sport pilot certificate, you must receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the following aeronautical knowledge areas:

(a) Applicable regulations of this chapter that relate to sport pilot privileges, limits, and flight operations;

(b) Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board;

(c) Use of the applicable portions of the "Aeronautical Information Manual" and FAA advisory circulars;

(d) Use of aeronautical charts for VFR navigation using pilotage, dead

reckoning, and navigation systems;

(e) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts;

(f) Safe and efficient operation of aircraft, including collision avoidance, and recognition and avoidance of wake turbulence;

(g) Effects of density altitude on takeoff and climb performance;

(h) Weight and balance computations;

(i) Principles of aerodynamics, powerplants, and aircraft systems;

(j) Stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery techniques, if applicable;

(k) Tumble entry, tumble avoidance techniques for weight-shift-control aircraft category privileges;

(l) Aeronautical decision making and judgment; and

(m) Preflight action that includesĖ

(1) How to get information on runway lengths at airports of intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements; and

(2) How to plan for alternatives if the planned flight cannot be completed or delays are encountered.

Section 53. What flight proficiency requirements must I meet to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

To apply for a sport pilot certificate, you must receive and log ground and flight training from an authorized instructor on the following areas of operation for airplane single-engine, glider, gyroplane, airship, balloon, powered parachute, and weight shift control privileges:

(a) Preflight preparation;

(b) Preflight procedures;

(c) Airport, seaplane base, and gliderport operations, as applicable;

(d) Takeoffs (or launches), landings, and go-arounds:

(e) Performance maneuvers, and for gliders, performance speeds;

(f) Ground reference maneuvers (not applicable to gliders and balloons);

(g) Soaring techniques (applicable to gliders only);

(h) Navigation;

(i) Slow flight and stalls (stalls not applicable to lighter-than-air aircraft and gyroplanes);

(j) Emergency operations; and

(k) Post-flight procedures.

Section 55. What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?

Use the following table to determine the experience you must have to apply for a sport pilot certificate depending on aircraft category and class:

If you are applying for a sport pilot certificate withÖ

Then you must log at leastÖ

Which must include at leastÖ

(a) Airplane category and single-engine class privileges,

20 hours flight time, including at least 15 hours of flight training in a single-engine airplane from an authorized instructor and at least 5 hours solo flight training in areas of operation established in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 2 hours cross-country flight training;

(2) 10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport;

(3) One solo cross-country flight of at least 75 nautical miles total distance, with a full stop landing, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations; and

(4) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(b) Glider category privileges, and you havenít logged 20 hours flight time in a heavier-than-air aircraft,

10 hours flight time in a glider, including 10 flights in a glider receiving flight training from an authorized instructor and at least 2 hours of solo flight time in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 5 solo launches and landings; and

(2) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(c) Glider category privileges, and you have logged 20 hours flight time in a heavier-than-air aircraft,

3 hours flight time in a glider, including 5 flights in a glider receiving flight training from an authorized instructor and at least 1 hour solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 3 solo launches and landings; and

(2) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(d) Rotorcraft category and gyroplane class privileges,

20 hours flight time, including 15 hours flight training in a gyroplane from an authorized instructor and at least 5 hours solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 2 hours cross-country flight training;

(2) 10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport;

(3) One solo cross-country flight of at least 50 nautical miles total distance, with a full stop landing, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations; and

(4) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(e) Lighter-than-air category and airship class privileges,

20 hours flight time, including 15 hours flight training in an airship from an authorized instructor and at least 3 hours performing the duties of pilot in command in an airship with an instructor in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 2 hours cross-country flight training;

(2) 3 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport;

(3) One cross-country flight of at least 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations; and

(4) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(f) Lighter-than-air category and balloon class privileges,

7 hours flight time in a balloon, including 3 training flights with an authorized instructor and one flight performing the duties of pilot in command in a balloon with an authorized instructor in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 2 hours cross-country flight training ;

(2) One solo cross-country flight of at least 25 nautical miles total distance between takeoff and landing locations; and

(3) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(g) Powered parachute category privileges,

20 hours flight time, including 15 hours flight training in a powered parachute from an authorized instructor and at least 5 hours solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 2 hours cross-country flight training;

(2) 10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport;

(3) One solo cross-country flight of at least 25 nautical miles total distance and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 15 nautical miles between takeoff and landing locations; and

(4) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

(h) Weight-shift-control aircraft category privileges,

20 hours flight time, including 15 hours flight training in a weight-shift-control aircraft from an authorized instructor and at least 5 hours solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in section 53 of this SFAR,

(1) 2 hours cross-country flight training;

(2) 10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport;

(3) One solo cross-country flight of at least 75 nautical miles total distance, with a full stop landing, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between takeoff and landing locations; and

(4) 3 hours flight training on those areas of operation specified in section 53 of this SFAR preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the date of the test.

 

Section 57. What tests do I have to take to receive a sport pilot certificate?

To receive a sport pilot certificate you must pass the following tests:

(a) Knowledge test. You must pass the required knowledge test on the applicable aeronautical knowledge areas listed in section 51 of this SFAR. Before you can take the knowledge test for a sport pilot certificate you must receive a logbook endorsement certifying you are prepared for the test from the authorized instructor who trained you or reviewed and evaluated your home-study course on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in section 51 of this SFAR.

(b) Practical test. You must pass the required practical test on the applicable areas of operation listed in sections 51 and 53 of this SFAR that apply to the light-sport aircraft privilege you seek. Before you can take the practical test for a sport pilot certificate, you must receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who provided you with flight training on the areas of operation specified in sections 51 and 53 of this SFAR in preparation for the practical test. This endorsement certifies you meet the applicable aeronautical knowledge and experience requirements and are prepared for the required practical test.

Section 59. Will my sport pilot certificate list light-sport aircraft category and class ratings?

No. Sport pilot certificates do not list light-sport aircraft category and class ratings. When you successfully pass the practical test for a sport pilot certificate, regardless of the light-sport aircraft privilege you seek, FAA will issue you a sport pilot certificate without any category and class ratings. You will receive a logbook endorsement of the category, class, and make and model aircraft you are authorized to operate.

Section 61. May I operate all categories, classes, and makes and models of light-sport aircraft with my sport pilot certificate?

No. If you hold a sport pilot certificate, you must have a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor for each category, class, or make and model of light-sport aircraft you operate.

Section 63. How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

To operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft you must:

(a) Receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who trained you on the areas of operation specified in sections 51 and 53 of this SFAR certifying that you have met the aeronautical and knowledge experience requirements for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek;

(b) Successfully complete a proficiency check from an authorized instructor other than the instructor who conducted your training on the areas of operation specified in sections 51 and 89 of this SFAR for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek; and

(c) Receive a logbook endorsement certifying you are proficient in the areas of operation and authorized for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege.

Section 65. How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional make and model of light-sport aircraft?

To operate an additional make and model of light-sport aircraft, you must receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who provided you aircraft-specific training for the additional light-sport aircraft make and model privileges you seek, certifying you are proficient in that make and model of light-sport aircraft.

Section 67. Must I carry my logbook with me in the aircraft?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate, you must carry your logbook or documented proof of all required endorsements with you on all flights. Documented proof includes a photocopy of the logbook endorsements or a pre-printed form that includes the endorsements.

Privileges and Limits of Holders of a Sport Pilot Certificate

Section 71. What type of aircraft may I fly if I hold a sport pilot certificate?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate, you may operate any light-sport aircraft, as defined in 14 CFR 1.1, for which you have received the proper logbook endorsements.

Section 73. What are my limits for the operation of light-sport aircraft?

(a) If you hold a sport pilot certificate, you must operate a light-sport aircraft in accordance with 14 CFR part 91. You are limited to sport and recreational flying only.

(b) You may not operate a light-sport aircraft:

(1) At night;

(2) In Class A airspace;

(3) In Class B, C, or D airspace, unless you have received ground and flight training and a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor certifying you are authorized to exercise this privilege;

(4) Outside the United States, unless you have prior authorization from the country in which you seek to operate. Your sport pilot certificate carries the limitation "Holder does not meet ICAO requirements;"

(5) That is used in a passenger-carrying airlift sponsored by a charitable organization;

(6) At an altitude of more than 10,000 feet MSL or 2,000 feet AGL, whichever is higher;

(7) When the flight or surface visibility is less than 3 statute miles;

(8) Without visual reference to the surface;

(9) That exceeds a VH of 87 knots CAS, unless you have received ground and flight training and a logbook endorsement from an instructor authorized to provide this training;

(10) Contrary to any operating limitation placed on the airworthiness certificate of the aircraft being flown;

(11) Contrary to any limitation or endorsement on your pilot certificate, airman medical certificate, U.S. driverís license, or any other limitation or logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor;

(12) While towing any object; or

(13) While carrying a passenger or property for compensation or hire.

Section 75. May I demonstrate an aircraft in flight to a prospective buyer?

If you are a sport pilot and you are not an aircraft salesperson, you may demonstrate an aircraft in flight to a prospective buyer. However, if you are an aircraft salesperson; you must hold a private pilot certificate and meet the requirements of 14 CFR 61.113(f).

Section 77. May I carry a passenger?

Yes. As the holder of a sport pilot certificate, you may carry one passenger.

Section 79. May I share operating expenses of a flight with a passenger?

Yes. You may share with a passenger the operating expenses of a flight, including fuel, oil, airport expenditures, and rental fees. However, you must pay at least half the operating expenses of a flight.

Section 81. How do I obtain privileges to operate in Class B, C, or D airspace?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek privileges to operate in Class B, C, or D airspace, you must receive and log ground and flight training from an authorized instructor who provides a logbook endorsement. That endorsement must certify you are proficient in the following aeronautical knowledge areas and areas of operation:

(1) The use of radios, communications, navigation system/facilities, and radar services;

(2) Operations at airports with an operating control tower to include 3 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower; and

(3) Applicable flight rules of part 91 for operations in Class B, C, or D airspace and ATC clearances.

Section 83. How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS you mustó

(a) Receive and log ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in an aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS; and

(b) Receive a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor certifying that you are proficient in the operation of this light-sport aircraft.

Transitioning to a Sport Pilot Certificate

Section 91. How do I obtain a sport pilot certificate if I already hold at least a private pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61?

(a) If you already hold at least a current and valid private pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61, and you seek to exercise the privileges of a sport pilot certificate, you may do so without any further showing of proficiency, subject to the following limits:

(1) You are limited to the aircraft category and class ratings listed on your existing pilot certificate when exercising your sport pilot privileges;

(2) You must receive specific training for any make and model of light-sport aircraft in which you have not acted as pilot-in-command; and

(3) You must receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who trained you and certified you are proficient in that make and model of light-sport aircraft.

(b) If you want to exercise the privileges of a sport pilot for a category or class for which you are not currently rated, you must meet the applicable category and class requirements contained in sections 51 through 57 of this SFAR.

Section 93. How do I obtain a sport pilot certificate if I do not hold a pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61, but I have been flying ultralight vehicles under 14 CFR part 103?

Use the following table to determine how to obtain a sport pilot certificate if you donít hold a pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61, but you have been flying ultralight vehicles under 14 CFR part 103:

If you areÖ

Then you mustÖ

And those records mustÖ

(a) A registered ultralight pilot with an FAA- recognized ultralight organization not later than 24 months after the effective date of the final rule, and you want to apply for a sport pilot certificate,

(1) Meet the eligibility requirements in sections 3 and 15 of this SFAR, but not the experience requirements in sections 51, 53, and 55 of this SFAR;

(2) Pass the knowledge test and practical test for a sport pilot certificate; and

(3) Obtain a notarized copy of your ultralight pilot records from the FAA-recognized ultralight organization,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(i) Document that you are a registered ultralight pilot with that FAA-recognized ultralight organization;

(ii) List each category and class of ultralight vehicle that the organization recognizes that you are qualified to operate; and

(iii) Be presented when applying for a sport pilot certificate.

(b) A registered ultralight pilot with an FAA- recognized ultralight organization after 24 months after the effective date of the final rule, and you want to apply for a sport pilot certificate,

(1) Meet the eligibility requirements in sections 3 and 15 of this SFAR;

(2) Meet the experience requirements in sections 51, 53, and 55 of this SFAR, however you may credit your ultralight flight and ground time in accordance with section 177 of this SFAR toward the experience requirements in sections 51, 53, and 55 of this SFAR;

(3) Pass the knowledge test and practical test for a sport pilot certificate; and

(4) Obtain a notarized copy of your ultralight pilot records from the FAA-recognized ultralight organization,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(i) Document that you are a registered ultralight pilot with that FAA-recognized ultralight organization;

(ii) List each category and class of ultralight vehicle that the organization recognizes that you are qualified to operate; and

(iii) Be presented when applying for a sport pilot certificate.

(c) Not a registered ultralight pilot with an FAA-recognized ultralight organization, and you want to apply for a sport pilot certificate,

(1) Meet the eligibility requirements in sections 3 and 15 of this SFAR;

(2) Meet the experience requirements in sections 51, 53, and 55 of this SFAR; and

(3) Pass the knowledge test and the practical test for a sport pilot certificate.

---

 

Section 95. How do I obtain a sport pilot certificate if I donít hold a pilot certificate and have never flown an ultralight vehicle?

If you donít hold a pilot certificate and havenít flown an ultralight vehicle, you must meet the applicable requirements of sections 3, 15 and 51 through 57 of this SFAR to obtain a sport pilot certificate.

Flight Instructor Certificate With a Sport Pilot Rating

Section 111. Must I hold an airman medical certificate?

While exercising the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating and while acting as pilot in command of a light-sport aircraft other than a glider or balloon, you must hold and possess;

(a) A current and valid U.S. driverís license; or

(b) A current and valid airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67.

Section 113. What aeronautical knowledge requirements must I meet to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

(a) To apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you must receive and log ground training on the fundamentals of instruction from an authorized instructor on all of the following:

(1) The learning process;

(2) Elements of effective teaching;

(3) Student evaluation and testing;

(4) Course development;

(5) Lesson planning; and

(6) Classroom training techniques.

(b) You do not have to comply with paragraph (a) of this section if:

(1) You hold a flight instructor certificate or ground instructor certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61;

(2) You hold a current teacher's certificate issued by a State, county, city, or municipality; or

(3) You are employed as a teacher at an accredited college or university.

(c) You must receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor on the aeronautical knowledge areas applicable to a sport pilot certificate.

Section 115. What training to meet flight proficiency requirements must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

(a) To apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating for all sport pilot aircraft categories, you must receive and log flight and ground training from an authorized instructor in the following areas of operation:

(1) Technical subject areas;

(2) Pre-flight preparation;

(3) Pre-flight lesson on a maneuver to be performed in flight;

(4) Pre-flight procedures;

(5) Airport, seaplane base, and gliderport operations, as applicable;

(6) Takeoffs (or launches), landings, and go-arounds;

(7) Fundamentals of flight;

(8) Performance maneuvers and for gliders performance speeds;

(9) Ground reference maneuvers (except for gliders and lighter-than-air);

(10) Soaring techniques;

(11) Slow flight and stalls (stalls not applicable to lighter-than-air and gyroplanes);

(12) Spins (applicable to airplanes, gliders, and weight-shift-control aircraft);

(13) Emergency operations; and

    1. Post-flight procedures.

(b) [Reserved]

Section 117. What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

Use the following table to determine the experience you must have for each aircraft category and class:

If you are applying for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating forÖ

Then you must log at leastÖ

Which must include at leastÖ

(a) Airplane category and single-engine class privileges,

(1) 150 hours flight time as a pilot,

(i) 100 hours flight time as pilot in command in powered aircraft;

(ii) 50 hours flight time in a single-engine airplane;

(iii) 25 hours cross-country flight time;

(iv) 10 hours cross-country flight time in a single-engine airplane; and

(v) 15 hours flight time as pilot in command in a single-engine airplane that is a light-sport aircraft.

(b) Glider category privileges,

(1) 25 hours flight time as pilot in command in a glider, 100 flights in a glider, and 15 flights as pilot in command in a glider that is a light-sport aircraft; or

(2) 100 hours in heavier-than-air aircraft, 20 flights in a glider, and 15 flights as pilot in command in a glider that is a light-sport aircraft.

 

(c) Rotorcraft category and gyroplane class privileges,

(1) 125 hours flight time as a pilot,

(i) 100 hours flight time as pilot in command in powered aircraft;

(ii) 50 hours flight time in a gyroplane;

(iii) 10 hours cross-country flight time;

(iv) 3 hours cross-country flight time in a gyroplane; and

(v) 15 hours flight time as pilot in command in a gyroplane airplane that is a light-sport aircraft.

(d) Lighter-than-air category and airship class privileges,

(1) 100 hours flight time as a pilot,

(i) 40 hours flight time in an airship;

(ii) 20 hours pilot in command time in an airship;

(iii) 10 hours cross-country flight time;

(iv) 5 hours cross-country flight time in an airship; and

(v) 15 hours flight time as pilot in command in an airship that is a light-sport aircraft.

(e) Lighter-than-air category and balloon class privileges,

(1) 35 hours flight time as pilot-in-command,

(i) 20 hours flight time in a balloon;

(ii) 10 flights in a balloon; and

(iii) 5 flights as pilot in command in a balloon that is a light-sport aircraft.

(f) Weight-shift-control aircraft category privileges,

(1) 150 hours flight time as a pilot,

(i) 100 hours flight time as pilot in command in powered aircraft;

(ii) 50 hours flight time in a weight-shift-control aircraft;

(iii) 25 hours cross-country flight time;

(iv) 10 hours cross-country flight time in a weight-shift-control aircraft; and

(v) 15 hours flight time as pilot in command in a weight-shift-control aircraft that is a light-sport aircraft.

(g) Powered-parachute category privileges,

(1) 100 hours flight time as a pilot,

(i) 75 hours flight time as pilot in command in powered aircraft;

(ii) 50 hours flight time in a powered parachute;

(iii) 15 hours cross-country flight time;

(iv) 5 hours cross-country flight time in a powered parachute; and

(v) 15 hours flight time as pilot in command in a powered parachute that is a light-sport aircraft.

 

Section 119. What tests do I have to take to get a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

To obtain a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you must pass the following tests:

(a) Knowledge test. Before you can take a knowledge test you must receive a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor certifying that you are prepared for that knowledge test. You must pass knowledge tests on:

(1) The fundamentals of instructing listed in section 113(a) of this SFAR, unless you met the requirements of section 113(b) of this SFAR; and

(2) The aeronautical knowledge areas required by section 113(c) of this SFAR.

(b) Practical test. Before you can take the practical test for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you must receive a logbook endorsement certifying that you meet the applicable aeronautical knowledge and experience requirements and you are prepared for the practical test. You must receive this endorsement from the authorized instructor who provided you the flight training on the areas of operation specified in section 115 of this SFAR that apply to the light-sport aircraft privilege you seek. You must also:

(1) Pass a practical test on the areas of operation listed in section 115 of this SFAR that are appropriate to the flight instructor privilege you seek;

(2) Pass a practical test in a light-sport aircraft that is representative of the category and class of aircraft for the privilege you seek;

(3) Receive a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor indicating that you are competent and possess instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures after you have received flight training in those training areas in an airplane, glider, or weight-shift-control aircraft, as appropriate, that is certificated for spins;

(4) Demonstrate you are able to teach stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures in an airplane, glider, or weight-shift-control aircraft, as appropriate. If you havenít previously failed a test based on this requirement, and you provide the endorsement required by paragraph (b)(3) of this section, an examiner may accept it instead of the demonstration required by this paragraph; and

(5) If you are taking a retest because you previously failed a test based on the requirement of paragraph (b)(4) of this section, you must pass a test on stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery instructional procedures in the applicable light-sport aircraft that is certificated for spins.

Section 121. What records must I keep and for how long?

(a) You must keep records that include the name of:

(1) Each person whose logbook or student pilot certificate you have endorsed for solo flight privileges, and the date of the endorsement;

(2) Each person for whom you have provided an endorsement for a knowledge test, practical test, or proficiency check and the record must indicate the kind of test or check, the date, and the results;

(3) Each person whose logbook you have endorsed as proficient to operate:

(i) An additional category or class of light-sport aircraft;

(ii) An additional make and model of light-sport aircraft;

(iii) In Class B, C, or D airspace; and

(iv) A light-sport aircraft with a Vh greater than 87 knots CAS; and

(4) Each person whose logbook you have endorsed as proficient to provide flight training in an additional:

(i) Category or class of light-sport aircraft; and

(ii) Make and model of light-sport aircraft.

(b) You must keep the records listed in paragraph (a) of this section for 3 years. You may keep these records in a logbook or a separate document.

Section 123. Will my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating list light-sport aircraft category and class ratings?

No. A flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating does not list light-sport aircraft category and class ratings. When you successfully pass the practical test for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, regardless of the light-sport aircraft privilege you seek, FAA will issue you a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating without any category and class ratings. You will receive logbook endorsements for the category, class, and make and model aircraft in which you are authorized to provide training.

Section 125. Am I authorized to provide training in all categories and classes of light-sport aircraft with my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

No, you may provide training only in a category and class of light-sport aircraft for which you have received the proper endorsements. If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you must have a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor for each additional category and class and for each additional make and model of light-sport aircraft in which you provide training.

Section 127. How do I obtain privileges to provide flight training in an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

To obtain privileges to provide flight training for an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft, you must:

(a) Receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who trained you as specified in section 115 of this SFAR for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek. This endorsement certifies you have met the aeronautical and knowledge experience requirements for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek; and

(b) Successfully complete a proficiency check from an authorized instructor other than the instructor who trained you on the areas specified in section 115 of this SFAR for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek. The authorized instructor will certify in your logbook that you are proficient in the areas of operation and authorized for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege.

Section 129. How do I obtain privileges authorizing me to provide flight training in an additional make and model of light-sport aircraft?

To obtain privileges to provide flight training in an additional make and model of light-sport aircraft, you must receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who provided you aircraft-specific training for the additional light-sport aircraft make and model you seek. The endorsement certifies you are proficient to provide flight training in that make and model of light-sport aircraft.

Section 131. Do I need to carry my logbook with me in the aircraft?

Yes. You must carry your logbook or documented proof of required endorsements with you while exercising the privileges of your flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating.

Section 133. What privileges do I have if I hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

You are authorized, within the limitations of your flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, to provide training and logbook endorsements for:

(a) A student pilot certificate to operate light-sport aircraft;

(b) A sport pilot certificate;

(c) A sport pilot privilege;

(d) A flight review for a sport pilot;

(e) A practical test for a sport pilot;

(f) A knowledge test for a sport pilot; and

(g) A proficiency check for an additional category or class and make and model privilege for a sport pilot certificate or flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating.

Section 135. What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you are subject to the following limits:

(a) You may provide ground and flight training only in the category, class, and make and model of light-sport aircraft for which you have received the proper logbook endorsements for both your pilot certificate and your flight instructor certificate;

(b) You must comply with the limitations established in ßß 61.87 (n), 61.93 (d), 61.195 (a), (d)(1)-(d)(3), and (d)(5);

(c) You must not provide flight training required for a sport pilot certificate or privilege or a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating or privilege unless you have at least 5 hours of pilot-in-command time or aeronautical experience, or any combination thereof, in the make and model of light-sport aircraft. You must get the aeronautical experience as a registered pilot with an FAA-recognized ultralight organization.

(d) You must not provide training for operations in Class B, C, or D airspace, unless you have the endorsement specified in section 81 of this SFAR, or are otherwise authorized to conduct operations in this airspace; and

(e) You must not provide training in a light-sport aircraft with a VH greater that 87 knots CAS, unless you have the endorsement specified in section 83 of this SFAR or are otherwise authorized to operate that aircraft.

Section 137. Are there any additional qualifications for training first-time flight instructor applicants?

No. You do not have to comply with the requirements for training first-time flight instructor applicants specified in 14 CFR 61.195(h).

Section 139. May I give myself an endorsement?

No. If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you may give yourself an endorsement for any certificate, privilege, flight review, authorization, practical test, knowledge test, or proficiency check required by 14 CFR part 61.

Transitioning to a Flight Instructor Certificate With a Sport Pilot Rating

Section 151. What if I already hold a flight instructor certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61 and want to exercise the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

(a) If you already hold at least a current and valid flight instructor certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61, and you seek to exercise the privileges of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you may do so without any further showing of proficiency, subject to the following limits:

(1) You are limited to the aircraft category and class ratings listed on your existing pilot certificate and flight instructor certificate when exercising your flight instructor privileges;

(2) You must receive specific training for any make and model of light-sport aircraft in which you have not acted as pilot in command, and the instructor who conducted your training must endorse your logbook certifying that you are proficient in that make and model of light-sport aircraft; and

(3) You must comply with the requirement in section 135 of this SFAR to have at least 5 hours of pilot in command time in the specific make and model light-sport aircraft.

(b) If you want to exercise the privileges of your flight instructor certificate in a category, class, or make and model of light-sport aircraft for which you are not currently rated you must meet the requirements contained in sections 127 and 129 of this SFAR.

Section 153. What if I am only a registered ultralight instructor with an FAA recognized ultralight organization?

If you are a registered ultralight instructor with an FAA-recognized ultralight organization not later than [Date 36 months after the effective date of the final rule.], and you want to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating:

(a) You must hold either a current and valid sport pilot certificate or at least a current and valid private pilot certificate issued under 14 CFR part 61;

(b) You must meet the eligibility requirements in sections 3 and 111 of this SFAR. You do not have to meet the experience requirements in sections 113 through 117 of this SFAR, except as specified in section 153(c) of this SFAR;

(c) You must have at least the minimum total pilot flight time in the category and class of light-sport aircraft specified in section 117 of this SFAR. You need not meet the pilot-in-command, time in aircraft category and class, and cross-country pilot flight time requirements specified in section 117 of this SFAR. You may credit flight time as the operator of an ultralight vehicle in accordance with the logging of flight and ground time requirements under section 177 of this SFAR;

(d) You need not meet the aeronautical knowledge requirement specified in section 113(a) of this SFAR or meet the exception specified in section 113(b) of this SFAR if you have passed the FAAís or an FAA-recognized ultralight organizationís Fundamentals of Instruction knowledge test;

(e) You must obtain and present upon application a notarized copy of your ultralight pilot records from the FAA-recognized ultralight organization. Those records must:

(1) Document that you are a registered ultralight flight instructor with that FAA-recognized ultralight organization; and

(2) List each category and class of ultralight vehicle that the organization recognizes that you are qualified to operate and authorized to provide training in; and

(f) You must pass the knowledge test and practical test for a sport pilot certificate.

Section 155. What if Iíve never provided flight or ground training in an aircraft or an ultralight vehicle?

You must meet all of the applicable requirements under sections 3 and 11 through 119 of this SFAR to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating.

Pilot Logbooks

Section 171. How do I log training time and aeronautical experience?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate or flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you must document and record training time and aeronautical experience according to 14 CFR 61.51 and the pilot logbook requirements of this SFAR.

Section 173. How do I log pilot-in-command flight time?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate you may log flight time as pilot in command only whenó

(a) You are the sole manipulator of the controls of an aircraft for which you have privileges; or

    1. You are the sole occupant of the aircraft.

Section 175. May I use training time and aeronautical experience logged as a sport pilot toward a higher certificate or rating issued under 14 CFR part 61?

Yes, you may use training time and aeronautical experience documented as a sport pilot to meet the requirements for a higher certificate or rating in accordance with 14 CFR 61.51 and sections 173, 177 and 179 of this SFAR.

Section 177. May I credit training time and aeronautical experience logged as an ultralight operator toward a sport pilot certificate?

(a) You may credit training time and aeronautical experience as the operator of an ultralight vehicle toward the experience requirements of a sport pilot certificate ifó

(1) You are a registered ultralight pilot with an FAA-recognized ultralight organization; and

(2) Your ultralight training time and aeronautical experience is documented in accordance with the provisions for logging training and aeronautical experience specified by that organization.

(b) If you want to credit the training time and aeronautical experience you have logged in an ultralight vehicle toward a sport pilot certificate or flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you can only do so in the same category and class of light-sport aircraft. That is, if you have been flying a powered parachute ultralight, you can apply your experience to the requirements for a powered parachute light-sport aircraft, but not to the requirements for a weight-shift-control light-sport aircraft.

Section 179. May I use aeronautical experience I obtained as the operator of an ultralight vehicle to meet the requirements for a higher certificate or rating issued under 14 CFR part 61?

You may not use aeronautical experience you obtained as the operator of an ultralight vehicle to meet the requirements for a certificate or rating specified in 14 CFR 61.5, except for that time credited to meet the requirements for the issuance of a sport pilot certificate under this SFAR.

Recent Flight Experience Requirements for a Sport Pilot Certificate

or a Flight Instructor Certificate With a Sport Pilot Rating

Section 191. What recent flight experience requirements must I meet for a sport pilot certificate?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate, you must comply with the appropriate recent flight experience requirements specified in 14 CFR 61.57.

Section 193. What are the flight review requirements for a sport pilot certificate?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate, you must comply with the appropriate flight review requirements specified in 14 CFR 61.56.

Section 195. How do I renew my flight instructor certificate?

To renew your flight instructor certificate, you must comply with the requirements specified in 14 CFR 61.197.

Section 197. What must I do if my flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires?

If your flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating expires, you may exchange that certificate for a new certificate by passing a practical test as prescribed in section 119 of this SFAR. The FAA will reinstate any privilege authorized by the expired certificate.

Ground Instructors

Section 211. What are the eligibility requirements for a ground instructor certificate?

You must meet the eligibility requirements in 14 CFR 61.213 to be eligible for a ground instructor certificate or rating.

Section 213. What additional privileges do I have if I hold a ground instructor certificate with a basic ground instructor rating?

If you hold a ground instructor certificate with a basic ground instructor rating, specified in 14 CFR 61.215(a), you are authorized the following additional privileges:

(a) Ground training in the aeronautical knowledge areas required for a sport pilot certificate or privileges under 14 CFR part 61;

(b) Ground training required for a sport pilot flight review; and

(c) A recommendation for a knowledge test required for a sport pilot certificate.

Section 215. What additional privileges do I have if I hold a ground instructor certificate with an advanced ground instructor rating?

If you hold an advanced ground instructor rating, specified in 14 CFR 61.215(b), you are authorized the following additional privileges:

(a) Ground training in the aeronautical knowledge areas required for any certificate or privileges under this SFAR;

(b) Ground training required for a sport pilot flight review; and

(c) A recommendation for a knowledge test required for the issuance of any certificate under this SFAR.

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